Barbershop Prostate Initiative

 
GOING TO THE BARBERSHOP TO FIGHT CANCER
GET TESTED. GET A HAIRCUT.
 
WHAT IS BARBERSHOP PROSTATE INITIATIVE?
The Barbershop Prostate Initiative is a free program for African American and Latino men.
The United Way of Greater Mercer County and its partners identify and train barbers on the
importance of prostate screenings and early detection, health promotion strategies, and, if 
needed, treatment. Barbers then learn how to educate and navigate the health system for men
at elevated risk of prostate cancer.
 
We aim to reach at-risk groups, where they already are...in Barbershops!
 
 
The Prostate is a doughnout-shaped gland with several lobes. It is located below the bladder
about halfway between the rectum and the base of the penis. It encircles the urethra (the 
tube that carries urine from the bladder out through the penis), and in young men it is 
normally about the size of a walnut. The prostate produces most of the fluid that makes up
semen.
 
WHY BARBERSHOPS?
There are two reasons we use barbershops. Barbers are trusted and well known in a
neighborhood, plus a barbershop is typically the busy center of a neighborhood. Most
of us are comfortable talking to our barber about life, our families and other personal
things. If anyone is going to tell us how it is-- our barber will. 
 
HOW DOES IT WORK?
When you are getting your haircut your barber will talk to you about your prostate. He will 
tell you about the dangers of prostate cancer, screening methods and how to maintain
a healthy prostate. You will be encouraged to get screened for prostate cancer by getting
screened at your local clinic or Doctor's office. Once you get screened you return to 
your barber shop with a signed voucher granting you one free haircut!
 
WHAT'S INVOLVED?
Prostate screening can be done two ways: through a Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) blood 
test and/or Digital Rectal Examination (DRE). The PSA test measures the blood level of
PSA, a protein that is produced by the prostate gland. The higher your PSA level, the 
more likely it is that he has prostate cancer. Because there is no specific normal or
abnormal level of PSA in the blood, it is critical to be tested every year to compare
PSA levels from previous years. There are additional reasons for having an elevated PSA
level, and some men who have prostate cancer do not have elevated PSA. Therefore, 
you are encouraged to undergo a DRE to check for growths in, or enlargement of, the 
prostate gland. A tumor in the prostate can often be felt as a hard lump. This may be done
as part of a regular examination or to check on symptoms, such as a change in urination.
 
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
John Santana at 609-896-1912 or barbershop@uwgmc.org
 
Community Outreach Liason:
Jeffrey Clark at 609-609-896-1912 or Jeffrey.Clark@uwgmc.org